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JavaScript Ternary Operator

Posted in Javascript Tutorial

The JavaScript ternary operator, also known as the conditional operator, is a concise way to write simple conditional statements. It’s often used to assign a value to a variable based on a condition. The ternary operator has the following syntax:

condition ? expressionIfTrue : expressionIfFalse
  • condition: An expression that evaluates to either true or false.
  • expressionIfTrue: The value or expression to be returned if the condition is true.
  • expressionIfFalse: The value or expression to be returned if the condition is false.

Here’s an example that demonstrates how the ternary operator works:

var age = 20;
var message = (age >= 18) ? "You are an adult" : "You are a minor";

console.log(message); // Output: "You are an adult"

In this example, if the age variable is greater than or equal to 18, the condition (age >= 18) is true, and the message “You are an adult” is assigned to the message variable. If the condition is false, the message “You are a minor” is assigned.

You can use the ternary operator to make your code more concise and readable when you have simple conditional assignments. However, it’s important not to overuse it, as overly complex ternary expressions can make your code less readable.

Key Points of JavaScript Ternary Operator

The JavaScript ternary operator is a powerful and concise way to express conditional logic in your code. Here are the key points to remember about the ternary operator:

  1. Syntax: The ternary operator has the following syntax:
    condition ? expressionIfTrue : expressionIfFalse
    
  2. Condition: The condition is an expression that evaluates to either true or false. It determines which of the two expressions will be executed.
  3. ExpressionIfTrue: This is the value or expression that will be returned if the condition is true.
  4. ExpressionIfFalse: This is the value or expression that will be returned if the condition is false.
  5. Conciseness: The ternary operator is a concise way to express simple conditional logic and is often used for assigning values to variables based on a condition.
  6. Readability: While the ternary operator can make your code more concise, it’s important to strike a balance between conciseness and readability. Complex or nested ternary expressions can be hard to understand, so use them judiciously.
  7. Alternative to if...else: The ternary operator is an alternative to the if...else statement when you have simple conditional checks.
  8. Example:
    var age = 20;
    var message = (age >= 18) ? "You are an adult" : "You are a minor";
    

     

    In this example, the message variable is assigned either “You are an adult” or “You are a minor” based on the condition age >= 18.

  9. Return Value: The ternary operator itself returns a value based on the condition, so you can use it in assignments, function calls, and expressions.
  10. Nesting: You can nest ternary operators within each other to handle more complex conditions, but be cautious not to make your code too convoluted.
  11. Error Handling: The ternary operator can be used for simple error handling or default value assignments.
  12. Use Cases: It’s commonly used for tasks like setting default values, choosing between two options, or deciding the plural form of a word based on a count.
    Related:   JavaScript Assignment Operators

     

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